Effects of Trump’s executive ban on International students at Humber Effects of Trump’s executive ban on International students at Humber
President of Humber College Chris Whitaker has released a statement following the news surrounding U.S. President Donald Trump’s recent executive order on immigration. “In... Effects of Trump’s executive ban on International students at Humber

President of Humber College Chris Whitaker has released a statement following the news surrounding U.S. President Donald Trump’s recent executive order on immigration.

“In light of the United States’ recent travel ban, we are supporting our students who may be negatively impacted by the restrictions. Any international student that has questions about travel to the U.S. should contact the International Centre for more information,” Whitaker said in a statement.

President Trump signed an executive order Friday night banning refugees from entering the country for 120 days and immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries for three months. The countries included in the ban are Iraq, Iran, Syria, Somalia, Sudan, Libya and Yemen.

Humber College boasts a population of 3,800 international students from 100+ countries across the world. Each year, the international population of students increases.

Some students and faculty at Humber are citizens of or have family members in the countries affected by the ban.

Garaad Kaar, a recent graduate of Humber College first came to Canada as an International student from Somalia.  Kaar now holds dual citizenship in Canada and Somalia. Kaar says he believes this ban can have a negative impact on students studying in Canada from any of the countries listed under the ban.

“I’m not sure what this means for students from these countries studying here but I just know it can’t be good,” he said.

“I remember when I was a student I would always fly back home during holidays, that could potentially be a problem now with the ban not allowing people from certain countries to travel to the U.S, people might not be able to go home or even come back and that’s hard knowing that some people just want a better life most times when they come here from their home countries.”

Kaar says he hopes that the faculty at Humber and other universities across Canada are doing all they can to help support students who might need assistance in a time like this.

Most Canadian universities are also concerned that the new executive order will affect students, faculty and staff at the 97 universities across Canada hosting international students.

Universities Canada released a statement on Sunday addressing the impact of the ban on universities in Canada.

The statement supports Prime Minister Trudeau’s statement that Canada will continue to welcome those “fleeing persecution, terror and war” regardless of faith and affirming that “diversity is our strength.”

They stated, “the new executive order is having an impact on Canadian campuses and communities that is real, immediate and profound.”

The new executive order also has many Canadians worried about the potential effects it may have on them traveling to the U.S.

According to a recent Globe and Mail statistic, there are more than 35,000 Canadians with dual citizenship from one of the seven countries.

Immigration minister Ahmed Hussen, a former refugee from Somalia, one of the countries on Trump’s 90-day ban, says that U.S. officials has confirmed that Canadian citizens who hold dual citizenship with one of the countries affected by the ban will not be prevented from entering the U.S.

The recent executive order has caused protests across the U.S and Canada. Skedline photojournalist Fallon Hewitt covered the protest in Toronto yesterday. Check out the photo gallery here.

 

Kabrena Robinson

Just a bright-eyed and highly driven student journalist attempting to change the world through Journalism.

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